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100k - $50 million

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$100k - $25 million

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Nationwide (excluding NV, ND, SD)

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Purchase or Refinance

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5/1, 7/1, 10/1, 30yrs fixed

Fix-and-Flip

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$100k - $25 million

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Nationwide (excluding NV, ND, SD)

Loan Type

Purchase or Refinance

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Up to 18 Months

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Residential loan resources

assumable mortgage

Assumable Mortgage: Simplifying the Transition of Homeownership

In the intricate landscape of real estate financing, various mechanisms facilitate the transfer of property ownership. Among these, the assumable mortgage stands out as a unique proposition. Rather than starting afresh with a new loan, this instrument allows a homebuyer to step into the seller’s existing mortgage shoes. By inheriting the current loan’s terms, conditions, and often its interest rate, potential buyers can navigate the home-buying process with a distinct advantage. What is an Assumable Mortgage? At its core, an assumable mortgage allows a buyer to “assume” or take over the seller’s existing home loan. Instead of initiating a new loan process, the buyer continues with the original loan’s terms. The most enticing aspect is often the interest rate. If the seller had secured the loan during a period of lower interest rates, the buyer stands to benefit immensely. Such a scenario means that even if market rates rise, the buyer enjoys the lower rate from the original agreement. This structure can lead to significant long-term savings and immediate equity in the property. Historical Context of Assumable Mortgages Historically, the concept of assumable mortgages has roots in periods marked by volatile interest rates. During times when rates soared, an assumable mortgage became an invaluable asset. Sellers could leverage their low-rate mortgages as a prime selling point, making their property an attractive proposition. For buyers, this meant an avenue to bypass current high rates, securing property under more favorable terms. Over decades, as financial landscapes shifted and regulations evolved, the core appeal of assumable mortgages persisted. Especially in rising rate environments, they serve as a testament to forward-thinking financial planning. How Assumable Mortgages Work For both sellers and buyers, the process involves distinct steps. Sellers must first ascertain if their mortgage is assumable. This verification typically involves a close examination of the loan agreement or direct consultation with the lender. Once established, the property can be marketed with the added value of the assumable loan. Buyers, on the other hand, start by expressing their interest. This declaration is followed by a comprehensive qualification process. It’s imperative to note that assumption doesn’t bypass lender scrutiny. Buyers must still meet the lender’s criteria, ensuring they are financially equipped to handle the loan’s obligations. Types of Assumable Mortgages Assumable mortgages are primarily associated with Federal Housing Administration (FHA) and Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) loans. These government-backed loan programs inherently support the assumption of the mortgage by a new borrower, making them popular contenders for assumable financing. FHA Loans: FHA loans are well-known for their assumable feature. When a homebuyer with an existing FHA loan sells their property, the buyer can assume the existing FHA loan and its terms, provided they meet certain eligibility criteria. This can be an attractive option, especially when interest rates are lower than current market rates. VA Loans: VA loans, designed to assist eligible veterans, active-duty service members, and certain members of the National Guard and Reserves, also offer assumable benefits. Like FHA loans, VA loans can be assumed by a qualified buyer, potentially offering favorable loan terms. In contrast, conventional loans, while not inherently designed as assumable, may occasionally include “due-on-sale” clauses in their terms. These clauses stipulate that the entire loan balance must be repaid immediately upon the sale or transfer of the property, effectively preventing the assumption of the loan. However, it’s important to note that exceptions may arise in specific scenarios and with certain lenders, allowing for the assumption of conventional loans even in cases where due-on-sale clauses are present. The availability and terms of assumable mortgages can vary, so it’s crucial for both buyers and sellers to carefully review the loan documentation and consult with lenders to determine the feasibility of assumption in their specific circumstances. Benefits of Assumable Mortgages For both parties involved, assumable mortgages present a slew of benefits. Sellers can capitalize on enhanced marketability, especially in competitive arenas. The unique proposition of an assumable mortgage, particularly with a favorable rate, can catalyze quicker sales and potentially higher property valuations. Buyers, conversely, can reap the rewards of lower interest rates, translating to long-term savings. Moreover, the acquisition process may see reduced closing costs and a more streamlined procedure, given that a significant portion of the loan’s groundwork is already laid. Drawbacks and Considerations While the advantages of assumable mortgages are evident, they come with their set of considerations. One primary concern for sellers is potential liability. Depending on the mortgage agreement, a seller might remain on the hook if the buyer defaults on payments after the loan assumption. This lingering liability can be a significant deterrent for sellers. For buyers, while the prospect of a lower interest rate is appealing, they must be wary of the equity difference. If the seller has substantial equity in the property, the buyer might need to make a sizable down payment to cover this gap. Furthermore, not all mortgages are assumable, and even those that are require the buyer to qualify with the lender, adding another layer to the process. Qualifying for an Assumable Mortgage  The assumption process isn’t as simple as taking over payments. Lenders have a vested interest in ensuring that the assuming party is financially capable of handling the loan. Thus, buyers must undergo a qualification process similar to applying for a new mortgage. This can include credit checks, income verifications, and sometimes even property appraisals. If a buyer doesn’t meet the lender’s criteria, the assumption request could be denied. It’s also worth noting that any fees or costs associated with the assumption process are typically borne by the buyer. Comparing Assumable Mortgages to Traditional Mortgages When weighing the merits of assumable versus traditional mortgages, several factors come into play. Traditional mortgages provide a clean slate, allowing buyers to negotiate terms based on current financial standings and market conditions. They can shop around for the best rates and terms suitable for their needs. In contrast, with assumable mortgages, buyers are locked into the seller’s existing loan terms. While this can be advantageous

Fannie Mae FHA

Which One’s Right for You? Comparing Loan Options between Fannie Mae and FHA

When buying a home, securing the right mortgage is crucial. Two popular options for homebuyers in the United States are loans backed by Fannie Mae and the Federal Housing Administration (FHA). Each loan program offers unique advantages and considerations, making it essential to understand their key differences.  This comprehensive guide will compare Fannie Mae and FHA loans regarding eligibility requirements, loan limits, mortgage insurance, interest rates, and down payment requirements. Armed with this knowledge, you’ll be better equipped to decide which loan option is the best fit for your homeownership goals. Understanding Your Mortgage Options Before delving into the specifics of Fannie Mae and FHA loans, it’s essential to grasp the basics of these mortgage programs. Fannie Mae Loans: Fannie Mae, officially known as the Federal National Mortgage Association, is a government-sponsored enterprise (GSE) that operates in the secondary mortgage market. It does not originate loans directly to borrowers but purchases mortgages from lenders, providing them with funds to make more loans. Fannie Mae loans are conventional mortgages, meaning they are not insured or guaranteed by the government. These loans are typically suited for borrowers with good credit and a stable financial history. FHA Loans: The Federal Housing Administration, a part of the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), insures FHA loans. Unlike Fannie Mae, FHA loans are government-backed and designed to help individuals with lower credit scores or smaller down payments become homeowners. FHA loans are known for their more flexible eligibility requirements and lower down payment options. Eligibility Requirements One of the fundamental differences between Fannie Mae and FHA loans lies in their eligibility criteria. Fannie Mae Loans: These loans generally have stricter eligibility requirements compared to FHA loans. Borrowers seeking Fannie Mae loans typically need a higher credit score, often above 620, to qualify for a competitive interest rate. Additionally, Fannie Mae loans usually require a lower debt-to-income ratio, which means your monthly debts should be a smaller portion of your income. FHA Loans: FHA loans are renowned for their more forgiving eligibility requirements. While FHA loans have no set minimum credit score requirements, most lenders prefer a credit score of at least 580. However, FHA loans are accessible to borrowers with credit scores as low as 500, provided they can make a larger down payment. FHA loans also have more lenient debt-to-income ratio requirements, making them accessible to a broader range of borrowers. Loan Limits: Where Can You Buy? The loan limits imposed by Fannie Mae and the FHA can significantly impact your homebuying choices. These limits dictate the maximum loan amount you can borrow in a given area. Fannie Mae Loan Limits: Fannie Mae sets loan limits based on the Federal Housing Finance Agency’s (FHFA) conforming loan limits. These limits vary by county and are designed to reflect the average home prices in each area. Fannie Mae’s loan limits are higher in more expensive markets, such as major cities, allowing borrowers to secure larger loans. As of the latest information, the FHFA’s conforming loan limits for most areas in the contiguous United States ranged from $548,250 to $822,375. FHA Loan Limits: FHA loan limits are also determined by the geographical area but tend to be more uniform across regions. In most areas, the FHA’s maximum loan amount is lower than Fannie Mae’s conforming loan limits, making FHA loans ideal for first-time homebuyers or those looking to purchase in areas with lower housing costs. As of the latest data, the FHA’s standard loan limit for most areas was $420,680. To determine the loan limits for your specific location, consult the FHFA and HUD websites or speak with a mortgage lender familiar with these programs. Mortgage Insurance: Costs and Considerations Mortgage insurance is a crucial aspect of both Fannie Mae and FHA loans, and understanding how it works is essential for prospective homebuyers. Fannie Mae Mortgage Insurance: Fannie Mae loans typically require private mortgage insurance (PMI) when the borrower’s down payment is less than 20% of the home’s purchase price. PMI adds an extra cost to your monthly mortgage payments, but it allows you to secure a home with a smaller down payment. The cost of PMI can vary based on your credit score, down payment amount, and the loan-to-value ratio (LTV) of the loan. FHA Mortgage Insurance: FHA loans have their own unique mortgage insurance, known as mortgage insurance premiums (MIP). Unlike PMI, which can be canceled once you reach a certain level of equity in your home, MIP on FHA loans typically remains for the life of the loan if you make a down payment of less than 10%. The upfront MIP and annual MIP rates vary based on factors like your down payment and the loan term. In summary, while both Fannie Mae and FHA loans require some form of mortgage insurance for borrowers with smaller down payments, the specific costs and terms differ between the two programs. Be sure to consult with your lender to understand the impact of mortgage insurance on your loan. Interest Rates: Finding the Best Deal Interest rates can significantly affect the overall cost of your mortgage, so it’s essential to compare rates between Fannie Mae and FHA loans. Fannie Mae Interest Rates: Fannie Mae loans often feature competitive interest rates, especially for borrowers with excellent credit scores. Your creditworthiness, down payment amount, and the current economic environment all influence the interest rate you receive. It’s advisable to shop around and obtain quotes from multiple lenders to find the best Fannie Mae loan rate. FHA Interest Rates: FHA loans typically have slightly higher interest rates than Fannie Mae loans. This is partly because FHA loans cater to borrowers with lower credit scores and smaller down payments, which are perceived as higher risk by lenders. However, FHA interest rates can still be competitive, and they offer access to homeownership for those who might not qualify for conventional loans. To secure the most favorable interest rate, consider improving your credit score, saving for a larger down payment, and comparing

Single-Family vs Multi-Family

Single-Family vs Multi-Family

Whether you’re investing in real estate as a business venture or to generate passive income, it’s important to understand the difference between single-family vs. multi-family properties. Single-family properties are typically more expensive per unit than multi-family homes, but they offer more flexibility, privacy, and space.  Multi-family homes are often less expensive per unit and single units are typically easier to maintain, but they can also come with restrictions that limit your ability to make a return. Ultimately, the decision comes down to budget and investment objectives. Here’s what you need to know when considering the purchase of a single-family home vs. multi-family home.  What Is a Single Family Home? A single-family home is a type of residential property that consists of one dwelling unit. Single-family homes are typically stand-alone structures, though they can also be attached to other dwellings. This type of home is typically owner-occupied, but can be an excellent option for real estate investors who prefer to purchase and lease out standalone homes. While these homes are usually occupied by one family, some single-family homes may have multiple levels—each with its own dwelling unit. For example, a house with a basement apartment would be considered a single-family home, and a duplex (two units on one property) can be converted into a single-family home by knocking down walls. What Is a Multi-Family Residence? A multi-family home is a type of residential property composed of two or more dwelling units. These homes can be attached or detached, and they are typically owned by one person or entity. Multi-family homes are often used for rental purposes, though they can also be owner occupied. Multi-family homes can come in many different forms, the most common of which is an apartment building with multiple dwelling units on one property. Other types of multi-family homes include condominiums, townhouses, duplexes, and triplexes. Multi-family residences come in all shapes and sizes, from small apartment buildings to large complexes with hundreds of units. Which Is Right For You? The decision of whether to purchase a single-family home or a multi-family home depends on your investment objectives, needs, and preferences. If you’re looking to limit your per-unit cost, individual units in multi-family developments might be right for you. If you want larger structures that offer tenants more privacy and freedom, a single-family home might be a better choice. Ultimately, the decision comes down to what you value most in an investment. Why Choose a Single Family Home? There are many reasons why someone might choose a single-family home over a multi-family home. Single-family homes tend to be more affordable than multi-family complexes (though not individual units), and they often command higher rent than multi-family units. This is because they offer more privacy and freedom than multi-family properties.  And, if you own a single-family home, you won’t need to worry as much about complaints from tenants related to noisy neighbors or shared spaces. Likewise, many single-family homes aren’t subject to invasive homeowners associations (HOAs) that may assess your property or restrict how it is used. Keep in mind, however, that some single-family homes are subject to HOAs and there may be restrictions on use—such as whether homes must be owner-occupied. Why Choose a Multi-Family Home? Multi-family homes offer several advantages over single-family homes. First, they’re often considerably more affordable on a per unit basis—though this can vary by market. Multi-family homes also offer the opportunity to split certain maintenance expenses with other owners, as well as responsibilities for care of common areas (things like yard work or snow removal). Benefits to tenants of living in a multi-family residence include shared common areas, such as a lobby, pool, or courtyard, and the opportunity to meet new people. However, there can also be drawbacks, such as noise from other residents, limited parking, and more restrictions on how the property is used. The Difference Between a Single-Family Home vs. Multi-Family Home A single-family home is a residence that houses one tenant or group of tenants. These may consist of individuals, partners, parents with children, or other groups. Single-family homes are the most common type of housing in the United States. They are usually detached homes, meaning there are no shared walls with neighboring homes. A multi-family residence is a housing unit that contains—in separate units—more than one tenant or family. Multi-family homes are less common in most markets than single family homes, but they have become more popular in recent years as the cost of housing increases. The main difference between single-family vs. multi-family homes is that single-family homes are designed for individual families or tenants, whereas multi-family homes are designed to house many different groups of people. From a real estate investing standpoint, single-family homes are seen as stable long term investments, while multi-family residences are seen as being more volatile. From a resident’s perspective, single-family homes usually have more privacy and space than multi-family homes. Multi-family homes often have amenities, such as community pools, laundry facilities, and gyms, that single-family homes do not. Pros and Cons of Investing in Single-Family Homes Pros Easier to manage than multi-family residences Typically more affordable (on a per-unit basis) than multi-family residences Provide renters more privacy than multi-family residences Often easier to sell than multi-family residences Easier to finance than multi-family residences Cons Maintenance and repair costs are not shared with other owners Yard work, snow removal, and other property management services are the owner’s or resident’s responsibility Fewer tenants are willing or able to pay the higher rent Pros and Cons of Multi-Family Homes Pros Can provide more regular rental income than single-family homes Rent more quickly than single-family homes Units often appreciate faster than single-family homes Less to manage, if common areas are handled by associations or managers Cons Common areas may require more management and maintenance Mechanicals are often older and less energy-efficient than in single-family homes May have higher insurance costs than single-family homes Complexes are considerably more expensive to purchase than single-family homes May be more difficult to

Financing a Fourplex: Construction Costs & Loan Options

Financing a Fourplex: Construction Costs & Loan Options

Financing a fourplex construction can be difficult, but there are a variety of loan options available to help get the job done. Take time to explore and understand each of these options as well as the costs associated with building a fourplex before planning a development.  What Is a Fourplex? A fourplex is a residential property with four separate units. Fourplexes are usually smaller than larger apartment buildings, and they may be owner-occupied or rental properties. This type of multifamily development is typically built as rentals, but can also be converted into condos or co-ops.   Fourplexes are unique because they’re the largest multi-family properties (in terms of number of units) that are eligible for conventional financing through Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac loans. That means that if you’re looking to finance a fourplex construction, you have more loan options available to you than if you were building a larger apartment complex. How Much Does It Cost to Build a Fourplex? The cost to build a fourplex varies widely based on a number of factors, including the location of the property, size of the units, construction quality, and interior finishes. In general, you can expect to pay anywhere from $200,000 to $400,000 for the construction of a fourplex, but it may cost more. These are some of the expenses associated with building a fourplex: Land How much you pay for land depends primarily on the size and location of the property, but expect to pay $40,000 or more for the land. For example, building a fourplex in a city center will typically be more expensive than building one in a suburban or rural area where land costs are lower.   You’ll also incur several thousands of dollars in financing costs for the purchase of land. Also, keep in mind that land usually must be purchased with cash, and the land will ultimately be used as collateral to secure a construction loan.  Site Preparation, Utilities, and Permits After you purchase the land, you’ll need to pay to have the site graded and utilities installed, including septic systems or sewer hookups. This can cost anywhere from $5,000 to $50,000 or more, depending on the size of the property and the location.   You will also need to obtain several permits in order to begin construction on your fourplex. These include a building permit, a plumbing permit, and an electrical permit. The cost of permits varies widely depending on the municipality in which the property is located, but you can expect to pay several hundred to several thousand dollars in permit fees. Fourplex Construction Costs Fourplex construction costs vary based on the type of materials used and the level of finishes. Using higher-end materials and finishes will obviously cost more than using basic materials. Budget for around $125 to $150 per square foot for basic construction costs depending on floor plan, material construction, number of windows, and finishes.    For example, building a 2,000-square foot fourplex with basic materials and finishes would cost approximately $250,000 to construct. Holding Costs Don’t forget you will have to cover holding costs for the property leading up to and during construction. These expenses are extremely property-specific and include taxes and insurance, as well as any interest you may accrue on your construction loan. Ways to Finance Fourplex Construction Costs There are several financing options available for those looking to build a fourplex. One option is to take out a construction loan, which can be used to finance the entire project from start to finish. Another option is to secure financing through an investment group or private lender. Finally, you could also use your own savings or equity to finance the construction of your fourplex. Construction Loans The best way to finance construction of a fourplex is with a multifamily construction loan. To take advantage of this option, use cash to buy the land where you intend to build, and then put together a pro forma showing the projected costs of construction and value of units. Then, apply for a loan through a  commercial lender.   Construction loans are typically interest-only during the draw period, meaning you only have to make payments on the interest accruing on the loan during construction. Once construction is complete, the loan will need to be refinanced into a permanent mortgage with fixed monthly payments. Conventional Residential Loan A conventional residential loan can be used to finance the construction of a fourplex. This type of loan is typically available through banks and credit unions, but requires that you live in one of the units. The terms of these loans vary, but they typically have fixed interest rates and require a downpayment of 20% or more. Hard Money Loans Hard money loans are another option to consider for fourplex construction. These loans are typically provided by private investors or lending companies, rather than traditional financial institutions. Hard money loans often have higher interest rates and shorter repayment terms than other types of loans. However, they can be easier to qualify for, and the approval process is usually quicker. Where to Get a Fourplex Construction Loan If you’re thinking about financing a fourplex construction, it’s important to understand the different types of possible lenders and the loan options available. Here’s a brief overview: Commercial Banks Commercial banks are one of the most common sources of financing for fourplex construction. If you have a good relationship with your local bank, this can be a good option to explore. However, commercial banks typically have more stringent eligibility requirements and may require higher down payments than other lenders. Credit Unions Credit unions are another potential source of financing for fourplex construction. They typically have lower interest rates than commercial banks and may be more willing to work with borrowers who don’t have perfect credit. However, credit unions usually require memberships, though these may be obtained as part of the application process. Loan Brokers Loan brokers can be a good option for those who are having trouble securing