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Some of Our Retail Loan Programs

Bridge Financing

Loan Size

100k - $10 million

Program Territory

Nationwide (excluding NV, AZ, ND, SD)

Loan Type

Purchase or Refinance

Loan Term

Up to 18 months (extensions available)

Long-Term Rental

Loan Size

$75k - $20 million

Program Territory

Nationwide (excluding NV, ND, SD)

Loan Type

Purchase or Refinance

Loan Term

5/1, 7/1, 10/1, 30yrs fixed

Ground-Up Construction

Loan Size

100k - $50 million

Program Territory

Nationwide (excluding NV, ND, SD)

Loan Type

Purchase or Refinance

Loan Term

Up to 24 months

Renovation and Rehab

Loan Size

100k - $10 million

Program Territory

Nationwide (excluding NV, AZ, ND, SD)

Loan Type

Purchase or Refinance

Loan Term

Up to 18 months (extensions available)

Benefit from our experience in

Single Tenant

Connect with lenders specializing in non-investment grade and non-rated single-tenant retail properties.

Cannabis Dispensaries

Find local credit unions and other lenders offering financing to the cannabis industry.

Mixed-Use Facilities

Connect with top lenders to purchase or cash-out refinance your mixed-use property.

Types of Retail Financing

Acquisition

Close your purchase smoothly and on time thanks to our automated loan process

Cash-Out Refinance

Maximize your cash out refinance with our high LTV products

Refinancing

Secure better rates and terms for your investment by accessing our network of 500+ lenders

Bridge Loans

Take advantage of our competitive rates on bridge loans and options to roll over to longer term loans

Rehab/Improvement

Connect with lenders that have experience financing remodeling projects

Retail loan resources

shopping center investment

Shopping Center Investment: A Comprehensive Guide

In the ever-evolving realm of real estate investments, shopping centers stand as prominent assets within the retail asset class. These versatile properties encompass a diverse range of structures, from single buildings housing multiple retail tenants to sprawling complexes with numerous retail-focused structures. Shopping centers predominantly house retail stores, supermarkets, and restaurants, offering essential goods and services to consumers.

ttm analysis

Trailing 12 Months (TTM) Analysis: Definition and Practical Applications

In finance and business, few tools have proven as effective and adaptable as Trailing 12 Months (TTM) analysis. TTM serves as an evaluation tool that assists in drawing a comprehensive financial picture of a business. It helps investors and company owners understand a company’s financial health and performance more holistically. This article will explore the concept of TTM, its significance, how it works for small businesses, its application in securing business loans, and circumstances when it should be avoided. With this knowledge, businesses of all sizes can leverage TTM to inform decisions and drive growth. Understanding Trailing 12 Months (TTM) Calculation TTM measures a company’s financial performance over the last 12 months. It includes the most recent data available, ensuring it reflects the company’s financial health up-to-date. TTM includes all four quarters of the company’s fiscal year and can provide more recent information than an annual report. Unlike traditional financial statements that rely on a fiscal year’s data, TTM offers a more fluid and updated snapshot of a company’s financial standing. It incorporates data from the past 12 consecutive months, regardless of the fiscal year-end, offering more comprehensive insights. How TTM Works for Small Businesses? Small businesses can leverage TTM to gain an insightful understanding of their financial standing. By reviewing their performance over the previous 12 months, businesses can identify trends, detect potential problems, and make data-driven decisions. TTM offers a level of flexibility that is particularly beneficial for small businesses. These businesses often experience seasonal fluctuations in sales, and TTM allows for these variations, providing a clearer picture of their overall performance. In contrast to annual reports, which might skew perceptions of performance due to seasonal impacts, TTM offers a balanced perspective that spans an entire year. Calculating TTM: A Step-by-Step Guide The process of calculating TTM is relatively straightforward. Here is a step-by-step guide: Gather Financial Data: Begin by collecting the financial data for the most recent four quarters. Ensure that this data encompasses all the pertinent financial metrics you’re interested in, such as revenue, earnings, cash flow, and other relevant indicators. Segment the Data: If the data you’ve gathered isn’t already broken down quarterly, you’ll need to divide it into four distinct segments. Each segment should represent a three-month period, ensuring that the entire data set covers a full year. Aggregate the Data: Once you have the data segmented by quarter, sum up the values from all four quarters to derive the TTM value for the specific metric you’re analyzing. Practical Application: For instance, if you’re looking to determine the TTM revenue, simply sum up the revenue figures from each of the last four quarters. This cumulative value will give you the TTM revenue for the company. The Importance of Trailing 12 Months Analysis TTM analysis is critical for several reasons. It provides the most current perspective on a company’s financial performance, which can be instrumental in making strategic business decisions. TTM also allows companies to track their progress toward financial goals throughout the year and make necessary adjustments. Moreover, TTM helps businesses identify financial trends and patterns that may need to be visible when looking at financial data from a single quarter or fiscal year. This can enable companies to respond more quickly to changes in their financial performance, thereby improving their financial management and planning. Enhancing Business Decisions with TTM TTM analysis can significantly enhance business decisions. Offering a real-time snapshot of a company’s financial health allows businesses to identify areas where they are performing well and areas where they may need to make improvements. For instance, if a company sees a consistent increase in revenue over the last four quarters in its TTM analysis, it can infer that its sales strategies are effective. Conversely, if its expenses have been trending upward, it may need to consider cost-saving measures. Applying TTM for Business Loans TTM can be a valuable tool when applying for business loans. Lenders often prefer to look at the most recent financial data when determining a company’s loan repayment ability. By providing a comprehensive view of the last 12 months, TTM allows lenders to assess a business’s current financial strength and cash flow. A strong TTM report can enhance a company’s loan chances. Lenders will likely view a company with stable or increasing revenues and controlled costs more favorably, leading to better loan terms. When Not to Utilize TTM Analysis? While TTM can be a powerful tool, it may not be the best option in some situations. TTM may not be as helpful for businesses that have undergone significant changes in the last 12 months, such as a merger, acquisition, or restructuring, as the financial data may need to reflect the company’s ongoing operations accurately. Similarly, for startup businesses that have not been in operation for a full 12 months, TTM analysis may not provide a complete financial picture. A quarterly or even monthly analysis may be more appropriate in such cases. Unlocking the Hidden Patterns: TTM Insights for Business Growth TTM analysis can unlock hidden patterns in a company’s financial data, providing critical insights for business growth. By analyzing the data from the last 12 months, businesses can identify growth trends, pinpoint successful strategies, and anticipate potential challenges. TTM insights can guide businesses in setting realistic financial goals, allocating resources efficiently, and making strategic decisions that drive growth. The Evolution of TTM in Modern Business As the business world evolves with the emergence of digital enterprises, e-commerce, and the gig economy, traditional fiscal year-end reports might miss the intricacies of these modern models.  TTM analysis, with its continuous 12-month view, captures the financial shifts driven by technology, market changes, or consumer behaviors. As businesses innovate, TTM ensures stakeholders maintain a clear, current perspective on financial performance. Bottom Line TTM is a versatile tool that can provide businesses with valuable insights into their financial health. By taking into account the most recent 12 months of data, TTM analysis presents an up-to-date and comprehensive picture of a company’s performance.  This can

Triple Net Lease

Triple Net Lease Meaning

A triple net lease is a commercial lease under which the tenant is responsible for all—or an agreed upon portion—of the property’s operating expenses, insurance, and taxes. The term net, in this case, refers to the fact that the tenant is responsible for these expenses, in addition to rent. Triple net leases are commonly used for industrial and retail properties, such as shopping centers and warehouses.

Commercial Loans: What They Are & How They Work

Commercial Loans: What They Are & How They Work

Commercial loans help business owners and real estate investors make large purchases or fund operations. There are several types of commercial loans, and most are available through traditional banks and online lenders. Rates, loan amounts, and terms vary by financial institution, but borrowers can generally access up to 75% to 80% of project costs, at rates starting at 3% to 4%. What Is a Commercial Loan? A commercial loan is a type of funding offered to businesses through traditional banks and online lenders. These loans are most commonly used to pay for major capital expenses and to cover operational costs. This type of financing is often secured by specific collateral —such as real estate or machinery—although this is not always the case. Business owners can typically choose from products like conventional term loans, business lines of credit, as well as commercial real estate loans (CREs) that finance the purchase of commercial properties like office buildings, manufacturing facilities, and shopping centers. How Do Commercial Loans Work? Commercial loans are extended by traditional banks, credit unions, and other financial institutions, as well as by online lenders. The application process for these loans varies by lender, but it typically involves providing documentation of the business owner’s personal finances and business finances. Depending on the borrower’s needs and creditworthiness, loan amounts can vary from several thousands of dollars up to several millions of dollars. Annual percentage rates (APRs) start at 3% or 4% and go up to 20% or higher, depending on the loan type and the borrower’s credit history. Once a commercial loan is approved, funds are disbursed to the business account and interest begins to accrue at the agreed rate. Payments are made monthly for a set term—typically up to five or 10 years, but this number can be up to 20 or 25 years for some federally insured programs like those backed by the Small Business Administration (SBA). Unlike traditional term loans, commercial loans are often not fully amortized, which means that a loan may have a five- or 10-year term, but have a 25-year amortization schedule. This results in a balloon payment that must be paid in full or refinanced at the end of the loan term. Types of Commercial Loans Depending on your line of business, you may think of commercial real estate loans or bridge financing as the most common type of commercial loans. However, there are several commercial lending options designed to fit various borrowing needs. Each loan type comes with its qualification, approval, and funding processes, as well as unique interest rates and loan to value (LTV) ratios Commercial Loan Rates Loan Type Average Rates Average LTV Ratio Traditional Bank Loans 5% to 7% 80% Commercial Real Estate Loans 3.77% and up 66% to 73% Commercial Construction Loans 4.75% to 9.75% 75% Bridge Loans 4.20% to 12.20% 80% Hard Money Loans >10% to 18% 60% to 80% SBA 504 Loan 2.231% to 2.399% 90% Term Loans Term loans are traditional loans with a fixed term—or payment schedule. These loans can be short-, intermediate-, or long-term with repayment extending from three months to 10 years. Once funds are disbursed, borrowers make monthly or quarterly payments that are composed of both principal and interest. Annual percentage rates may be fixed or flexible, but usually start around 9%, with loan amounts as large as $500,000. Commercial Real Estate Loans Commercial real estate loans are loans secured by commercial property. These loans can be used to acquire, renovate, demolish, or otherwise invest in commercial real estate. Properties can take the form of offices, stores, hotels, or any other property operated for commercial purposes. Commercial Construction Loans Commercial construction loans are ideal for businesses that want to build or significantly renovate a commercial property for their own purposes. These loans are often structured with an initial draw period, during which business owners or their contractors can gradually withdraw money as work is completed. When construction is complete the loan converts to fixed-rate term financing. Bridge Loans A bridge loan is a type of high-interest, temporary financing with loan terms usually limited from six to 12 months. In general, bridge loans are used to help a business owner close a deal before they’re able to secure long-term, fixed-rate financing. These loans are ideal when a deal has to close quickly or a business owner needs to sell or refinance other assets before securing long-term financing. Business Lines of Credit A business line of credit is a form of business financing that can be accessed on an as-needed basis. Annual percentage rates range anywhere from 10% to 99% and borrowing limits extend from about $2,000 to $250,000. In contrast to a traditional commercial loan, a business line of credit is used on a revolving basis, and interest is only paid on the portion of the credit line being accessed—or what the borrower actually uses. With this type of financing, a business owner can access a line of credit until the draw period—typically as long as five years—is over. If the business owner repays a portion of what they’ve drawn against the line of credit, they can access those funds again. After the draw period, the repayment period begins, and the borrower must make monthly payments on the outstanding balance, including interest. Equipment Financing Business owners who need to purchase large equipment or machinery may benefit from equipment financing. This type of commercial loan can also be used to purchase smaller items like office furniture and electronics and is secured by the underlying collateral—the items purchased with the loan funds. Equipment loan amounts vary based on the items being purchased but tend to range up to $1 million or higher. Interest rates vary by lender and borrower creditworthiness, but are often lower than some other forms of financing and extend from around 8% up to 30%. Terms are also flexible and can range up to 25 years. SBA Loans SBA loans are business loans issued by banks and backed by the U.S. Small